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5 Practical Tips for Setting Employee Goals

The new year has arrived and it’s tempting to dream big, plan big and set goals for the year ahead. But it’s important that these goals are measurable and attainable. Therefore, a manager should not only guide the improvement in employee performance but should also actively help strengthen the business and enhance its reputation as an employer of choice in today’s competitive hiring market.

To get you off to the best start in 2023, we listed five straight forward tips that can be used as a guide for you and your team to set goals you can actually achieve.

  1. Align employee goals with company objectives

When an employee understands how their individual role and responsibilities contribute to the overall company aims and objectives, they’re often more focused and motivated to achieve goals that result in success for both themselves and the company. Managers should keep this in mind by communicating the overall company goals to their team. In turn, this will keep employees more focused on their targets and their work in achieving them.

  1. Encourage employees to identify job-specific goals

Often managers will have certain key targets put in place for each employee, depending on their job. However, it does pose an insightful strategy if employees are asked to identify what goals they feel are important for their role within the organisation. From here, if the employees self-suggested goals align with the company’s objectives, a manager can then work in tandem with their employees to develop action plans to attain those goals.

  1. Set SMART goals

In order for employees to realistically achieve their goals it’s important to carefully plan clear, attainable and trackable goals using the SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timely) framework. This method is a practical way to outline the steps necessary to reach any goal. Each element of the SMART goal framework works collaboratively to set boundaries, define next steps, identify necessary resources, and pinpoint indicators of progress. Consider using this framework when working with employees to help them create a strong foundation for success.

  1. Keep track of goals with regular check-ins

If you don’t track your progress, you will never know if you are making any. Managers and their direct reports should track the progress of goals with transparency and accountability. The best way to do this is to conduct regular check-ins or one-to-one meetings with your team members. Regardless of the frequency of these conversations (weekly, monthly), their purpose remains the same – to keep the lines of communication open between managers and employees and keep track of goals that have been set. Simply put, the more employees and managers communicate, the better they will be able to work together to achieve goals, develop skills, and give or receive feedback. If quarterly goals are regularly evaluated and refreshed, then working towards annual goals will become smoother thanks to improved communication.

  1. Reward employees who achieve their goals

It’s important to acknowledge employees who achieve or exceed any goals they have been set. Not only does this recognition highlight that employee’s efforts, it also demonstrates that the company values their people who are committed and work hard. It may also further motivate your employees to work hard in achieving their goals. Alternatively, when hard work goes continuously goes unnoticed, employees will feel unmotivated and may reduce their productivity or even begin looking for a new job elsewhere where they feel more appreciated.

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Are you looking to transform how you manage performance in 2023? If so, book a meeting with one of our performance management experts here.

In today’s competitive hiring market, employee retention has become a number one priority for HR professionals. This is highlighted in a recent CEO survey by Deloitte proving that employees are now in a perfect position to find jobs that meet their needs professionally and also provide a good work/life balance. Employees have ever-evolving expectations about what they want from their employers, and companies need to listen to remain competitive.

This became more prevalent since the pandemic started in 2020 whereby there was a sudden shift regarding employee expectations in the workplace. And this will likely continue into the year ahead as remote and hybrid working models have now long replaced the traditional on-site working week and is here to stay.

In many ways this new working model presents HR leaders with the opportunities to evaluate their current practices and continue to find more creative ways to attract top talent and improve employee retention and engagement. In turn, this will allow them to remain competitive in the market for jobseekers and retain their current employees.

To examine this further, we listed three employee retention strategies that HR leaders can implement to reap the benefits of what’s been learned over the last three years.  

  1. Encourage an open feedback culture

Creating a feedback culture within an organisation is a critical driver of positive organisational and financial outcomes and for employee retention as your people feel heard and valued. A positive feedback culture in an organisation is one where employees have access to each other, build and maintain relationships, address biases, have open dialogue, offer constructive criticism, and highlight accomplishments. Building a feedback culture is also vital to understand your employees’ opinions and feelings and how best to support them to do their job effectively. Based on this insight, organisations can then carry out strategies to meet the needs of their employees once they align with the goals of the business.

  1. Prioritise employee well-being

Employee well-being is a growing and important area where companies should continue to invest. Employees value the ability to continue working while caring for their families and themselves without worrying about having to sacrifice one over the other. To help address and avoid employee burnout, focus on implementing mental health support programs; offering access to diverse wellness coaches; allowing for sick leave; and look at developing social events to encourage a more welcoming and friendly dynamic within the organisation such as team building activities.

  1. Use coaching to foster a sense of trust and accountability

HR leaders should reconsider how they evaluate employee productivity and performance measurement. The emphasis should move from managing to coaching and building performance management models that encourage open conversations, provide continuous feedback, and offer clear expectations on goals and outcomes. Now more than ever, employees need to be empowered to make the right decisions, accelerating innovation and autonomy.

Are you looking to transform how you manage performance with an HR platform that your employees will love? Book a meeting with one of our performance management experts here at a time that suits you.

 

 

What a year it’s been for Our Tandem. We’ve had the excitement of joining the beqom family this summer, bringing a new offering to the market that combines performance with rewards. We’ve evolved our product and integrated it into Microsoft Teams, bringing a seamless feedback experience into the natural flow of work. Plus we’ve seen huge progress to continuous performance management in our clients. So we can safely say 2022 has been our most successful year yet.

But before the year draws to a close, we thought we’d combine our five most popular blog posts of 2022 to share some of the key insights we’ve gained throughout the previous 12 months with you.

How Effective Performance Management Can Stop Quiet Quitting

How Effective Performance Management Can Stop Quiet Quitting

The term quiet quitting became popular this year when a TikTok video talking about quitting the idea of going above and beyond at work and simply doing the bare minimum went viral. Clearly the topic resonates with many people. Do you notice signs of ‘quiet quitting’ amongst your team? Or perhaps you’re the one quietly quitting your job because you don’t feel motivated? Here, we have broken it down to four key areas to focus on in your performance management journey to stop quiet quitting once and for all.

Read More

The 6 questions you should be asking about peer-to-peer feedback

6 Questions to Ask About Peer-to-Peer Feedback in Your Company

The idea of creating a peer-to-peer feedback culture feels more appropriate since the pandemic started as many employees are still working remotely and without the same level of daily interactions with managers that there was pre-covid. However, to implement such a model, managers need to consider these six key questions.

Read More

https://www.ourtandem.com/blog/4-major-hr-trends-to-expect-in-2023

The 4 Major HR Trends to Expect in 2023

Over the past three years HR teams have seen a huge change to what was considered the norm in the workplace. With the sudden shift to remote working in 2020 due to the pandemic and of course the never-ending threat of recession looming, HR departments have been challenged like never before. But what are the HR trends we can expect to see in 2023? With the new year fast approaching there’s no better time than now to examine what lies ahead in the coming months.

Read More

 

Using Effective Performance Management to Make You a Better Coach

How Performance Management Can Make You a Better Coach

Coaching is a fundamental element in the performance management journey for any leader. It can help identify an employee’s strengths and highlight what areas they need to improve upon. From here, managers can use their coaching skills to address the developmental needs of their team and help them to gain the necessary skills to successfully move forward. Here, you will learn three ways that you can use performance management to your advantage and become the coach your team deserves.

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3 Challenges in Fostering a Culture of Belonging in a Hybrid Workplace

How to Foster a Culture of Belonging in a Hybrid Workplace

It is more important than ever for organisations to foster a sense of belonging in their employees. This has become more challenging over the past two and a half years as the typical idea of what we used to call a workplace no longer has any limitations. However, in order to address this, organisations need to combat three major challenges with remote and hybrid working.

Read More

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Are you looking to improve how you manage performance and communicate with your employees? If so book a meeting with one of our performance management experts here to see how Our Tandem can help you transform your HR strategy for 2023.

Are you looking to transform your organisation’s performance management but not sure where or even how to start? This is where having an effective performance management strategy can help. But to start, let’s look at what effective performance management looks like. Quite simply, it’s about setting clear and measurable objectives for work. An effective performance management strategy should provide employees with clear objectives for their job, and plenty of opportunities for feedback and check-ins with their manager.

The benefits of adopting a performance management platform for your business are endless and can include highlighting where further employee training is needed and boosting staff morale which, in turn, increases productivity and performance. But today we are focusing on the four key benefits this can have specifically for your HR department.

 

  1. Increased employee retention

As every HR professional knows, staff are a vital asset to every company, regardless of its size, location, or industry. Therefore, ensuring you can retain your employees allows your management team to continuously work towards training and development of goals. This allows employees greater autonomy and the ability to highlight what areas they want to improve upon and what areas they excel in, thus giving them a reason to stay with a company that values their development.

 

  1. Sets clear employee expectations

An effective performance management platform provides all employees, regardless of seniority, with a clear set of objectives to work towards and an opportunity to contribute to the creation of these in a meaningful way. Having clearly defined expectations ensures that employees always know what’s expected of them, which in turn means that HR can be confident that everyone is fulfilling the correct duties.

 

  1. Identifies development and progression opportunities

Having an agile performance management approach means that HR can easily identify which employees are performing well and might be suitable for promotion and which need further development. It’s also a great way for allowing employees to analyse their own development, giving them the chance to express where they want to develop and work towards. This also allows for regular catch ups between managers and employees which improves on communication ensuring that there is full transparency on what is expected off all staff by HR.

 

  1. Improves employee engagement and motivation

Taking a continuous approach to performance management means that HR can spend less of their valuable time making sure all employees are working towards goals and objectives as the platform will provide full transparency on this across the organisation. Thus, allowing them to get the most out of their skills and roles. This ensures greater opportunities for job satisfaction and reaching achievements.

All the above benefits contribute to better performance within the business overall. Employees that are thriving will deliver better work and be more motivated to try new things and keep progressing. This underpins the importance of performance management for HR and the value it can bring to an entire organisation when done correctly.

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Are you looking to transform how you manage performance across your organisation? If so, book a meeting with one of our performance management experts here.

Over the past three years HR teams have seen a huge change to what was considered the norm in the workplace. With the sudden shift to remote working in 2020 due to the pandemic and the never-ending threat of recession looming, HR teams have been challenged like never before. But what are the HR trends we can expect to see in 2023? With the new year fast approaching there’s no better time than now to examine what lies ahead in the coming months.

 

  1. Employee visibility in hybrid settings

Hybrid working has many advantages such as improved work-life balance and more efficient use of time. However, it can pose several challenges when it comes to measuring performance, as more traditional approaches can rely on the assumption that work is better conducted in person during regular working hours. It’s important here that HR professionals avoid proximity bias, which is the unconscious tendency to favour employees you often see in the office over remote workers or those in different countries.

The simplest way to ensure employee visibility for those who are working hybrid or remote is to have regular check-ins with your team members using online technology. During these frequent check-ins, ask your team members what challenges they are facing and brainstorm ways to overcome them.

 

  1. Diversity, equity, and inclusion

It is more important than ever for employers to create meaningful change, particularly with marginalised groups or those who are underrepresented within the workplace. This ensures that your people feel heard and can contribute to the workplace in a meaningful and positive way. Therefore, to ensure you address diversity, equity and inclusion in ways that can enhance workplace culture ask the following questions:

  • Have your female employees received the same amount of feedback and check-ins as their male colleagues?
  • Is there the same level of ambition in development goals across peers from differing diverse groups?
  • Are you transparent and fair when it comes to pay?
  • Are you allowing employees to voice their opinion and feel heard without fear of consequence?
  • Do we have a greater value on certain behaviours in our organisation and are we clear how they translate into everyday performance, with clear measures, so that we avoid the subjectivity gap?

 

  1. Tackling quiet quitting

With the term quiet quitting becoming viral in the summer of 2022, it’s clear that many people can relate to the notion of simply doing the bare minimum and no more in the workplace. Whether we like it or not, quiet quitting is here to stay. But how can HR tackle quiet quitting in the new year to ensure their employees feel engaged at work? To start, this can involve clear communication that includes regular reviews, check-ins, and feedback. Trust is built and nurtured between managers and employees when there is frequent conversations and feedback that highlights where progress can be made and promptly addresses any issues that may arise.

The relationship between managers and employees is the most pivotal one when addressing the issue of quiet quitting. It’s important to remind your management team that putting time aside to build trust and understanding with their team members should be a priority for all involved.

 

  1. Employee wellbeing

According to a survey of HR leaders by Gartner, 47% cite employee experience as one of their top priorities for 2023. Employees are looking for companies to provide more flexible hours and benefits that fit their lifestyles; organisations that align with their values; and companies that take more of a holistic approach to mental and physical wellbeing.

Emotionally distant management should be a thing of the past. Employees want managers who are empathetic. This will make them feel more comfortable to address any issues they might be having at work, and it will ensure employees feel supported. In order to meet this requirement HR must make sure that their management team receives adequate support and training that is needed to help improve their interpersonal skills.

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Are you looking to transform how you manage performance in 2023? If so, book a meeting with one of our performance management experts here.

 

 

In order to succeed, employees need feedback, both good and bad, so they can leverage their strengths, improve their skill set and to simply perform better at their jobs. However, according to research by Harvard Business Review, men get more actionable feedback on the job than their female colleagues do. Similarly, research by Women in the Workplace also highlights that women are 20% less likely to receive actionable feedback that can contribute to their performance and growth at work.

Without any clear guidance from their managers, women must work harder to understand how to meet and exceed the expectations of their roles. This can be a daunting task and one their male counterparts are not faced with. Although this is, at its core, a management issue, and one that should be addressed by HR when examining their company’s culture, it still doesn’t change the fact that this is ongoing for many women, in many companies across the globe.

Therefore, it’s vital that women entering the workforce have the confidence to ask for feedback; but not just generic feedback that does not give any insight into one’s performance or skills. You need to be strategic in how you ask for it.

To get the feedback you need to grow, consider these three points:

  1.       Choose Your Timing

Don’t ask your boss for feedback randomly, like when you run into them in the hall. Feedback should be an ongoing, two-way conversation that takes place in a thoughtful environment and happens more frequently than annual performance reviews. Use one-on-one meetings and inflection points in your work to get the feedback you need.

  1.   Consider Your Sources

Your manager is not the only person you work with. Consider who else in the organization can provide you with clear and actionable insights about your performance. For example, peers, mentors, or contacts you trust are good sources to consider when looking for honest feedback.

  1.   Lead the conversation

Because we know that women get less feedback to begin with, it’s important for you to proactively and strategically seek out the advice that will help you in your role. Ask questions that will allow your manager to provide more specific information such as, “What are the things I do well?”, “How do my strengths align with the organization’s goals?”, or, “Is there anything I can do differently that would improve my performance?”

Frequently, managers can be hesitant when it comes to giving women negative feedback due to concerns around how they will respond. More specifically, they fear their feedback will be interpreted as “mean” or “hurtful.” These assumptions, largely built on gender-based stereotypes, can have direct negative repercussion on women’s careers. But remember, if you don’t ask for the feedback you need in order to grow and advance your career, you simply will not get it.

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Are you looking to improve how you provide feedback in your organization? Let Our Tandem help you by booking a meeting with one of our performance management experts here.  

Developing an effective performance management strategy that your people will love depends on several key factors such as clear communication, coaching and goal setting. During a time when isolation and remote working are ever-present, employees need all the above (and more) to effectively manage their work.

Therefore, to see an increase in employee performance, organisations must help employees meet the ever-changing needs of the business, organise their work with colleagues and take accountability for results. This is where performance management comes in!

Start as you mean to go on by developing a clear performance management strategy that not only drives business results, but also enables your people to be successful and grow within your organisation with these four employee benefits listed below.

  1. Improved Coaching

Coaching is a crucial element in the performance management journey for both leaders and employees. It can help identify what an employee’s strengths and weaknesses are. From here, managers can use their coaching skills to address the developmental needs of their team and help them to gain the necessary skills to successfully move forward. When using Our Tandem, you will have access to a personalised coaching dashboard.  This will include all insights in one place so everyone can own their growth and development.

 

  1. Allows Greater Autonomy

Clear communication is the key to effective management. This allows managers to highlight areas that may need to be improved upon to their team, or areas they may excel in. In turn, this allows employees to have greater freedom to drive their performance. For example, when using Our Tandem, an employee can give feedback, set a check-in, upload a goal, and more. Any day of the week, any time of the year, from any device.

 

  1. Creates a Sense of Purpose

It’s important to give your people purpose when they work. This enables employee to attach their goals to a strategic driver. Remember, when your people are working with purpose, it drives productivity.

 

  1. Regular Check-Ins

Trust is built and nurtured between managers and employees when there is frequent conversations and check-ins that highlights where progress can be made and addresses any issues that may arise swiftly. For example, with Our Tandem, 1 in 5 check-ins are created by employees and 50% of that feedback given is peer to peer. This brings work between peers and other stakeholders to life. With most work being done with peers, rather than directly with your manager, the lens by which the employee considers multiple perspectives.

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Do you want to join some of the world’s best performing companies in availing of a HR platform that not only improves performance and engagement but also empowers your employees? If so, book a free demo with one of our performance management experts today to see how Our Tandem can benefit your team and transform your performance management.

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Looking to improve how you manage performance? Book a meeting here with a member of the Our Tandem team to see how our end-to-end HR solution can help you transform your company culture with quick results from day one.

 

 

Developing an effective performance management strategy that benefits both leaders and employees alike relies on several key factors such as clear communication, coaching, goal setting and of course the right platform to use.  Therefore, it’s important to start as you mean to go on by developing a clear performance management strategy that not only drives business results, but also enables your managers to become the coaches their team needs. Some of the many benefits performance management plays for leadership teams include:

  1.   Better Time Management

With the average worker attending 12.9% more meetings since the pandemic began, an effective performance management strategy can eliminate countless meetings that interfere with your day-to-day duties as a manager. When using the Our Tandem platform, all managers have access to ‘My Team Dashboard’. This greatly helps time-poor managers have clear guidance and directions which makes coaching easier and quicker. The intuitive Team Dashboard on Our Tandem provides managers with a snapshot of their team’s performance. This enables managers to have an overview of their team so they can support and coach their team more effectively.

 

  1.   Better Coaching

Did you know that up to 45% of managers lack the confidence to help employees develop the skills they need to grow and develop within their roles? An effective performance management strategy will allow all managers and leaders access to helpful coaching tips and conversation prompts

So, if you’re looking for guidance on how to conduct an effective coaching conversation with your team members Our Tandem will give you the tools to lead your team with their wellbeing, growth, and personal development in mind.

 

  1.   Better Communication

A lot of the time many managers can be too busy to provide feedback to their team on an ongoing basis. However, feedback is an important aspect of all workplace communications. It highlights the areas that need to be improved upon and gives employees a sense of accomplishment when they are acknowledged for a job well done.

In the Our Tandem platform, we nudge managers to give their team feedback. This helps to develop managers’ coaching capabilities with reminders to act to ensure consistency of feedback. This also helps managers have fairer and more transparent conversations. With historic feedback, the manager can review the employee based on a holistic view that isn’t tainted by recent events.

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Do you want to become a better leader for your team and improve not only communication but performance?  If so, book a meeting with one of our performance management experts today to see how Our Tandem can benefit your team and transform your performance management with clear wins from day one.

 

Coaching is a fundamental element in the performance management journey for a leader. It can help identify an employee’s strengths and highlight what areas they need to improve upon. From here, managers can use their coaching skills to address the developmental needs of their team and help them to gain the necessary skills to successfully move forward.

Lynda Gratton, CEO and Founder of HSM Advisory, touched upon this when discussing the idea of the overwhelmed manager who may feel as though they have lost their traditional place in the workplace since the pandemic and therefore needs to embrace the next phase of their role as manager. Gratton articulates that a manager’s traditional role has become obsolete, but their new role is essential for today’s organisations. She breaks down the fundamental shifts in their role in the following three ways.

  1. Move from Manager to People Leader

You can move away from the idea of simply being a manager of your team by embodying the role of people leader. This involves a power shift from thinking about how the work carried out by your team will benefit you to how it will benefit the organisation. Simply stated, it shifts your thinking from ‘me’ to ‘we’.

Instead of thinking ‘my team makes me successful’ try ‘I’m here to make my team successful’. Or ‘I’m rewarded for achieving business goals’ can be developed into thinking ‘I’m also rewarded for improving team engagement, inclusion and skills relevancy’.

2. Move from Overseer to Performance Coach

 

Instead of simply overseeing your employees’ work and daily tasks try becoming a performance coach that tracks outcomes. For example, try coaching your team and enabling them to achieve their potential and even invite their feedback on your own style of management as opposed to always assessing team members against expectations

 

 3. Move from Physical to Digital

 

It goes without saying that the pandemic has changed the way we work. There is a larger focus on remote and hybrid working now than there ever was before. This changed the role of the traditional manager in an office setting whereby you managed an intact team of people in fixed jobs in physical workplaces. Teams are now more fluid, and a lot of the time communicate virtually.

Communication is the key to successful coaching, whether it is remote, hybrid or in an office. For example, reset your way of thinking with feedback. Instead of making goals and carrying out assessments annually, provide ongoing guidance on team priorities and give regular performance feedback.

 

Where to Next?…

To take managers on that journey, we can no longer rely on one off training programmes to bring the aspiration to reality. We need to embed it into every process and as they enter every process. If they are expected to give feedback or if they are entering a conversation with an employee in a regular check-in, the role of manager is to provide coaching tips at the point in time of when they are expected to perform each of these activities. This can remove stress from the situation and provide employees with the confidence to approach it.

It is fair to acknowledge that we often promote ‘players’, experts in their field with limited understanding of good people practice. They have a skill gap and a requirement to learn the skill of coaching before they can become true coaches to their team players.

Once off motivation moments or training programmes will have short term impacts, our role is to provide the learning now of relevance, before they enter the relevant conversation, so that they can build their capability quickly and it’s never been more needed than now.

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Looking to improve how you manage performance? Book a meeting here with a member of the Our Tandem team to see how our end-to-end HR solution can help you transform your company culture with quick results from day one.

 

 

Creating a feedback culture within an organisation is not only important for an employee’s professional growth, it is also a critical driver of positive organisational and financial outcomes. A positive feedback culture in an organisation is one where employees have access to each other, build and maintain relationships, address biases, have open dialogue, offer constructive criticism, and highlight accomplishments.

However, giving and receiving feedback can be uncomfortable for many people. For example, one study by PwC found that heart rates increased enough to show moderate to extreme anxiety in a spontaneous feedback scenario for both the giver and receiver of feedback. Although feedback is not always easy for both parties, it is vital in order to increase self-awareness and growth on both a personal and professional level.

A huge emphasis has been placed on giving feedback in the workplace, but the most underrated skill may be in receiving it. That’s because the power lies in the receiver’s ability to process and integrate the information in a way that ultimately makes them more effective.

If you’re not receiving the feedback you believe you need in order to grow, you can be proactive by simply asking a trusted colleague for feedback, but remember to make it specific. Rather than simply asking, “How am I doing?” try asking for feedback on a specific area in particular. For example, try asking “Could you give me feedback on my sales pitch please?” or, “Should I have spoken up more (or less) during yesterday’s team meeting?” 

According to the Harvard Business Review, there are four pivotal steps when it comes to asking for feedback:

  1. Make it clear you want honest feedback because it will genuinely help you grow.
  2. Focus on what you can do better in the future than on what went wrong in the past.
  3. Ask questions and be specific about times or areas you’re in need of feedback—such as your effectiveness in yesterday’s meeting.
  4. Listen rather than judge. Being defensive makes it less likely that the other person will be honest with you.

There is power in asking for feedback, because it helps you feel greater autonomy and certainty. You are in control and can direct the conversation to what will hold the most useful takeaways for you moving forward. You can reflect on which parts of the feedback rang true for you, and which parts may not have. Also, givers may not know when or how to offer feedback, so taking the initiative in asking offers them more certainty because they have a clearer direction about the kind of feedback you are looking for. Remember, by asking for specific information, it will feel more relevant to you and less threatening, helping the feedback session to feel more fair or equitable.

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Looking to improve the feedback culture within your organisation? Book a demo of the Our Tandem platform with one of our performance management experts today. 

 

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